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Supreme Court Reinstates Travel Ban

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Associated Press / Ted Warren

Associated Press / Ted Warren

Associated Press / Ted Warren

Anoushka Gupta, Staff Writer

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On December 4th, the Supreme Court upheld the latest version of Donald Trump’s travel ban and permitted its immediate enforcement.

  The decision came almost a year after the original travel ban was initiated by Executive Order 13769. The original ban was quickly barred by lower courts as a racist ban against Muslims; however, because this new ban included countries that are not majority Muslim, it was allowed.  In addition, because the new ban was approved by the Supreme Court, lower courts cannot overrule the decision.

  Solicitor General Noel Francisco, who fought for the ban in the Supreme Court, argued against the racist claims, stating, “The proclamation is based on national-security and foreign-affairs objectives, not religious animus.”

  The new travel ban will affect eight countries: Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Syria, Venezuela, Somalia, and Yemen. In addition, instead of banning all citizens of these countries, the ban will permit families and others who have a relationship with people in the United States to enter. In the case of Venezuela, the ban will only affect high-ranking officials and their families.

  Yilei Dong (12) said, “I agree with this ban because it feels less extreme than the original one. There’s been a lot of terrorist attacks lately, so I feel like this ban may prevent some of them.”

  The implementation of this ban was a sign that the Supreme Court might likely vote more conservative in the future on major issues. However, Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor stated that they would have kept the lower court orders blocking Trump’s travel ban.

  Despite the new ban being less severe than its predecessor, it is still perceived as racist by many. Omar Jadwat, director of Immigrants Rights’ Project, said, “It is unfortunate that the full ban can move forward for now, but this order does not address the merits of our claims. We continue to stand for freedom, equality, and for those who are unfairly being separated from their loved ones.”

  Ulia Zaman (10) said, “I feel like the ban is a symbol that we are moving backwards through time and returning to our racist ways of the past.”

  It is uncertain what the effect of the new legislation will be, but the ban represents a major victory for the Trump administration.

 

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