Warriors Bleed With Care

Warriors Bleed With Care

Madison Kuhlmann, Staff Writer

Early last week West High School’s National Honor Society teamed up with UCLA to host its annual blood drive in the Pavilion.

According to the National Honor Society President, Alex Hao (12), many students seemed interested and excited with an estimated 300 sign ups; however, only an estimated number of 200 students were actually able to give blood. More than likely this was because of age or physical requirements or a last minute fear. Either way, according to the United States Blood Donors Association, West was well within the average for a California high school with a student body of similar size to West.

“My parents advised against me giving blood, but I knew it was for a good cause. My hands were shaking but it was definitely quicker and easier than I expected,” said Hao, the president of National Honor Society.

For many students giving blood at a school sponsored drive is their first time. Sixteen year olds needed a parent consent form on top of being physically healthy, while seventeen and eighteen year olds simply needed to be up to specified requirements to maintain a smooth flow of usable material, recover safely, and donate again in the future (should they choose to do so).

“This was my first donation and it was really the positive peer pressure and support that helped me overcome my nervousness,” said Ryota Nishishiba (11)

It would seem that the knowledge that students are helping others either get better or feel better is the common theme for donating. West High’s student body appears to be kind and caring in the simplest of ways, and yet by doing something so small each student is making a huge difference to someone they have never even met.

All in all, this year’s blood drive has been labeled a success and the National Honor Society and UCLA hope to make even more of an impact next year.

If you are uneasy about the idea of giving blood, April Tsuei (12) “My advice is just to talk to the nurse and smile. Look away when they insert the needle and take deep breaths, donating is nothing to be scared of.”